The University of Texas Develops Trouble-Free Infrastructure Tool

Jan 30

The University of Texas Develops Trouble-Free Infrastructure Tool

The Center for Infrastructure Modeling and Management at the University of Texas will develop and improve an open source water infrastructure model. This will be used as an important tool, in order to assist communities throughout the city, with issues pertaining to their water infrastructures. The city of Dallas, as well as the vast majority of cities statewide, are struggling to manage flooding and pollution from storm water runoff, and climate change. The University’s mission is to demonstrate how neighborhoods can utilize green infrastructures to combat many of the present day challenges relating to stormwater management. One of the implemented tools will consist of an interactive website; to allow for community engagement with residents who are interested in water infrastructure modeling. The focus will primarily be on cities, water, and energy, as well as the greater implementation of tools to solve more of the substantially related difficulties. The Storm Water Management Model- a water quality simulation model used throughout the world- will be the most valuable tool for planning, analysis, and design related to storm water runoff, sewers, and other drainage systems. The current difficulties range from water losses due to leaks in decaying infrastructure, to the public health hazards of contamination. Interesting fact: Dallas did you know? Residents can estimate monthly water charges- based on the amount of gallons you expect to consume for the month- using an online calculator. This will be based on a 30-day billing cycle. Your actual residential water charges may vary depending on any rate changes. If you have an account with more than one meter, you will need to run the calculator for each meter. An example of use: if you want to estimate the cost of 5,000 gallons of water, enter 50 in the designated space; if you want to estimate 10,000 gallons, enter...

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