Dallas Schedules Sewer Maintenance and Sewer Overflow Advisory

Jan 10

Dallas Schedules Sewer Maintenance and Sewer Overflow Advisory

The city of Dallas has a worklist for the New Year that includes the extensive rehabilitation of streets and sidewalks and much-needed sewer overhauls. Recently, the city experienced a large sewer overflow, due to a pipeline collapse in a residential neighborhood. The estimated overflow was more than 300,000 gallons, making the upgrades even more imperative. The city is currently advising homeowner’s to use caution when using water supply wells. Preferably, use only water that has been distilled or boiled for at least one minute for all personal uses including drinking, cooking, and bathing. Residents with private water wells should have their well water tested and disinfected, if necessary, prior to discontinuing distillation or boiling. In an effort to correct the flooding the city has sustained, as well as enhance the sewer system, the Sewer Rehabilitation Project was recently approved and is currently underway. The project will systematically address a portion of the city’s pipelining infrastructures which will include a 42-inch trunk line running along the west side of the city. The rehabilitation project is anticipated to continue through the year. Construction experts and the city’s engineering consultants are collaborating on a five-area plan for the upcoming repairs.   Looking for a volunteer opportunity in Dallas? The city has created an experimental and creative way for local residents to get involved.  Volunteers throughout Dallas, as well as neighboring cities, will have the opportunity to collect and test water samples from water bodies just like the ones you find in your backyard. The results will then be made part of a statewide database for all residents of Texas to be able to monitor the results. It’ll be a fun way to spend time with your family, or perhaps even a means to get volunteer hours for a school requirement. Whatever the case may be, it will be an enjoyable learning...

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Dallas’ Proactive Effort to Keep Sewers Unimpaired

Nov 30

Dallas’ Proactive Effort to Keep Sewers Unimpaired

The city of Dallas is keeping things moving with a united resolve, as the heavy rainfall of recent days has placed quite a burden on the sewer system. Residents in many neighborhoods have been affected by the record-setting rainfall. Sewer overflows have been tallied in amounts of 100,000 gallons and greater in several locations. The state requires public notifications for spills of more than 100,000 gallons or when a spill occurs within a half mile of drinking sources.  In most cases, an average household uses 100,000 gallons of water a year, both indoor and outdoor.  Overflows can be caused by the inflow and infiltration of stormwater into the collection system. Heavy rain places a burden on aging sewers that are not designed to hold rainfall or to drain from the property, broken pipes or improperly connected sewer service lines. The city has addressed the issue of faulty pipelines through an Integrated Pipeline Project- a 150-mile-long water transmission system. The pipeline is designed to help meet water demands within Dallas and surrounding counties. The city of Dallas will save up to $500 million in capital expenses and potentially more than $1 billion over the life of the project. The advanced infrastructure project has received awards for a cohesive effort in sustainability and design.   Grease disposal tip: plumbing problems can result from pouring grease and food scraps down household drains. Pipe blockage can be prevented by scraping the excess from plates, pots, pans, utensils, and grills into a can or the trash. The garbage disposal is no place for grease. Proper disposal of grease will keep it out of the sewer system and away from causing damage to sewage and drain pipes as well as the environment. A collective effort can help keep sewer systems free from back-ups and harmful debris. Contact us...

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Arlington is on a Roll with Sewer Robots

Jun 13

Arlington is on a Roll with Sewer Robots

The city of Arlington has come up with an ingenious way to keep tabs on water quality. Along with the University of Texas at Arlington, the city has collaborated on the use of robots for sewers. The cost to the city is expected to be less than half the cost of hiring a complete service to run a robot and interpret the data. A floating robot will be equipped with a high-definition video camera, a laser to scan the concrete pipe above the water line and sonar to scan below. It will be pulled through the pipes on a cable. The city has 1,222 miles of sewer pipe, but the robot’s workplace will be 48 miles of the largest concrete pipes, which range from 24 inches to 66 inches in diameter. The deployment of robotic technology is also a means to cut water loss. The robot, equipped with a high-resolution camera and special sensors, will be designed to detect leaks and flaws in pipe that can’t be seen from above ground. The city is currently seeking to determine whether the entire section of the 30-year-old water main should be replaced at an estimated $1 million or spot repairs could be made for less. This project will have several phases, including traditional infrastructure upgrades. Costs will also be reduced through more timely repairs and reduction of emergency situations. Interesting fact: the city of Arlington is requesting of residents using rain barrels, to use containers specifically designed as rain barrels. In lieu of buckets, garbage cans or other homemade containers. Other suggestions include: • Be sure to always remove the water that pools at the top of the rain barrel at least once or twice a week. • If possible, place your rain barrel on a surface that will soak up any water that overflows so it doesn’t pool and create a mosquito habitat. • Regularly inspect your rain barrel system. Check for cracks or...

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Arlington’s Revamping Overhaul of Sewer Pipe Lines

Apr 05

Arlington’s Revamping Overhaul of Sewer Pipe Lines

The city of Arlington is implementing the process of replacing 2 percent of its water infrastructure. This is expected to be an annual endeavor for the city in an effort to maintain an ongoing gap analysis on the expected average lifespan of their water infrastructure.  The city’s most current project is replacing 10,200 linear feet of 6-inch water pipe in east Arlington near B.C. Barnes Park, using the cured-in-place pipe lining method for its sanitary sewer and waterlines.  The city also recently teamed with the University of Texas at Arlington to embark on a high-tech examination of 48 miles of large-diameter sewer pipelines. The project, which will start next month and last three years, will assist city officials determine the lifetime of vital sewer pipe and give the officials a way to isolate smaller areas for replacement. After a particularly rainy spring, one of the city’s major sanitary sewer lines collapsed. While making repairs, workers discovered that its walls had eroded away, which became the catalyst for several other rehabilitations throughout the city.  Partnering with UT Arlington offered a cost-effective solution that also takes advantage of the proximity of highly regarded experts at the UTA College of Engineer’s Center for Structural Engineering. The university and city workers will deploy a robotic unit that records video, sonar and laser data into sewer pipes in the city that measure 24 inches or larger.  The main purpose in doing so is to avoid the reoccurrence of sewer line failures. Arlington’s sewer pipe have been found to have an average of 31 years. Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you...

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Denton Incorporates Star Treatment for Sewer System

Oct 27

Denton Incorporates Star Treatment for Sewer System

The sewer system serving the City of Denton is being made over with an enhanced treatment program. The City’s Utility department has been growing and implementing a better approach to the maintenance of those systems in disrepair while simultaneously getting a handle on some of those growing pains. Sophisticated software and attentive deployment of manpower get the credit. Denton’s growth required the city to begin replacing existing sewer pipe with larger-diameter lines.  Officials began developing a master plan to identify pipe requirements for adequate capacity in response to increased demand. The task began with putting in more than 80 data points for every sewer line in the system. Each line was then graded on a scale from 1 to 100 for the priority of correcting problems that could lead to failure: the higher the number, the higher the priority. After completing those ratings, Denton followed up by using the information to organize its sewer line cleaning program into one, five, and 10-year cleaning cycles. Recently installed PVC lines in a new subdivision were put on a 10-year cleaning and inspection program. Smaller lines in older parts of the community, put on a five-year schedule. Lines deemed to be at the greatest risk, as well as lines serving high-volume sources like restaurants or apartment complexes, are scheduled to be checked annually.  Denton also changed its approach to CCTV inspection, again based on the priority rankings. Denton’s asset management program has grown so robust it even includes trees. At the University of North Texas, located in the city, researchers have mapped Denton’s tree canopy using satellite imagery. Because of Denton’s use of technology and equipment Denton has cut wet-weather overflow volume by 99.5 percent, and instances of choked sewer mains – whether from roots, clogs or other problems- have fallen by as much as 94...

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Duncanville’s Cross Connection Control program

Sep 29

Duncanville’s Cross Connection Control program

The purpose of a Cross Connection Control Program is to identify potential cross connections on the public water system and require that the proper backflow prevention device is installed at the potential source.  Duncanville requires Backflow Prevention Devices to be installed by a registered plumber or backflow installer and then tested by certified backflow tester who is registered with the Cross Connection Department. The original test report must be turned into the Cross Connection Department within one business day.  There is also a list of acceptable backflow prevention devices on the USC Foundation website (www.usclist.com). Devices must be approved by the University of Southern California Foundation for Cross Connection Control and Hydraulic Research.  Something to also keep in mind when reviewing the backflow prevention criteria, assemblies shown on the list have been evaluated with a specific set of shutoff valves as an integral part of the assembly. The specific shutoff valves are coded by a parenthetic code shown with each assembly. The coding of shutoff valves is defined specifically. Other shutoff valves having similar performance characteristics which permit the assembly to comply with the standards are also shown immediately after the original shutoff valves. The use of any shutoff valve on a specific assembly, other than those listed for that specific assembly invalidates the approval.  In addition, all commercial backflow devices will be determined based on the type of application and degree of hazard. These devices are required to be tested every year. Looking for a highly recommended plumber?  We’ve got you covered!  Perma-Liner Industries has partnered with the best plumbers in your area to provide you with outstanding service.  We provide only the best referrals for licensed and certified professionals.  Call us or go online to see how we can help.  1-866-336-2568 or...

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