Arlington is on a Roll with Sewer Robots

Jun 13

Arlington is on a Roll with Sewer Robots

The city of Arlington has come up with an ingenious way to keep tabs on water quality. Along with the University of Texas at Arlington, the city has collaborated on the use of robots for sewers. The cost to the city is expected to be less than half the cost of hiring a complete service to run a robot and interpret the data. A floating robot will be equipped with a high-definition video camera, a laser to scan the concrete pipe above the water line and sonar to scan below. It will be pulled through the pipes on a cable. The city has 1,222 miles of sewer pipe, but the robot’s workplace will be 48 miles of the largest concrete pipes, which range from 24 inches to 66 inches in diameter. The deployment of robotic technology is also a means to cut water loss. The robot, equipped with a high-resolution camera and special sensors, will be designed to detect leaks and flaws in pipe that can’t be seen from above ground. The city is currently seeking to determine whether the entire section of the 30-year-old water main should be replaced at an estimated $1 million or spot repairs could be made for less. This project will have several phases, including traditional infrastructure upgrades. Costs will also be reduced through more timely repairs and reduction of emergency situations. Interesting fact: the city of Arlington is requesting of residents using rain barrels, to use containers specifically designed as rain barrels. In lieu of buckets, garbage cans or other homemade containers. Other suggestions include: • Be sure to always remove the water that pools at the top of the rain barrel at least once or twice a week. • If possible, place your rain barrel on a surface that will soak up any water that overflows so it doesn’t pool and create a mosquito habitat. • Regularly inspect your rain barrel system. Check for cracks or...

Read More

Arlington’s Revamping Overhaul of Sewer Pipe Lines

Apr 05

Arlington’s Revamping Overhaul of Sewer Pipe Lines

The city of Arlington is implementing the process of replacing 2 percent of its water infrastructure. This is expected to be an annual endeavor for the city in an effort to maintain an ongoing gap analysis on the expected average lifespan of their water infrastructure.  The city’s most current project is replacing 10,200 linear feet of 6-inch water pipe in east Arlington near B.C. Barnes Park, using the cured-in-place pipe lining method for its sanitary sewer and waterlines.  The city also recently teamed with the University of Texas at Arlington to embark on a high-tech examination of 48 miles of large-diameter sewer pipelines. The project, which will start next month and last three years, will assist city officials determine the lifetime of vital sewer pipe and give the officials a way to isolate smaller areas for replacement. After a particularly rainy spring, one of the city’s major sanitary sewer lines collapsed. While making repairs, workers discovered that its walls had eroded away, which became the catalyst for several other rehabilitations throughout the city.  Partnering with UT Arlington offered a cost-effective solution that also takes advantage of the proximity of highly regarded experts at the UTA College of Engineer’s Center for Structural Engineering. The university and city workers will deploy a robotic unit that records video, sonar and laser data into sewer pipes in the city that measure 24 inches or larger.  The main purpose in doing so is to avoid the reoccurrence of sewer line failures. Arlington’s sewer pipe have been found to have an average of 31 years. Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you...

Read More

Permanent Flowmeters Installed in Dallas

Nov 13

Permanent Flowmeters Installed in Dallas

The history of the Dallas sewage collection system predates the turn of the century. In 1876, the first 24-inch sewer pipe was built in downtown Dallas, transporting wastewater to the river. What is now known as the wastewater collection system, however, began operating in the early 1900s. The collection system has grown with the city and now serves a population of more than 1.1 million people through approximately 4,100 miles of sanitary sewer mains. Dallas is now in the process of implementing a system to monitor the wastewater levels and flows. The project is part of the recommendations resulting from the Major Interceptor Study of the Wastewater Master Plan update. Once this system is in place, wastewater collection and wastewater treatment plants will receive real time flow information from as many as 70 sites throughout the city. The installation of the permanent flowmeters at key locations throughout the city is the latest phase in a multi-year project. Approximately 15 of the flowmeters will be installed permanently in the Dallas sewer system during the first phase. The long-term meters will monitor the system, look at the trends as they develop and evaluate how the system is performing hydraulically. In addition, the permanent flowmeters will be employed to keep the dynamic hydraulic model calibrated for wet and dry weather flows. Dallas, looking for a highly recommended plumber?  Perma-Liner Industries has partnered with the most knowledgeable plumbers in your area to provide you with outstanding service.  We provide only the best referrals for licensed and certified professionals.  Call us or go online to see how we can help.  1-866-336-2568 or...

Read More

Denton Incorporates Star Treatment for Sewer System

Oct 27

Denton Incorporates Star Treatment for Sewer System

The sewer system serving the City of Denton is being made over with an enhanced treatment program. The City’s Utility department has been growing and implementing a better approach to the maintenance of those systems in disrepair while simultaneously getting a handle on some of those growing pains. Sophisticated software and attentive deployment of manpower get the credit. Denton’s growth required the city to begin replacing existing sewer pipe with larger-diameter lines.  Officials began developing a master plan to identify pipe requirements for adequate capacity in response to increased demand. The task began with putting in more than 80 data points for every sewer line in the system. Each line was then graded on a scale from 1 to 100 for the priority of correcting problems that could lead to failure: the higher the number, the higher the priority. After completing those ratings, Denton followed up by using the information to organize its sewer line cleaning program into one, five, and 10-year cleaning cycles. Recently installed PVC lines in a new subdivision were put on a 10-year cleaning and inspection program. Smaller lines in older parts of the community, put on a five-year schedule. Lines deemed to be at the greatest risk, as well as lines serving high-volume sources like restaurants or apartment complexes, are scheduled to be checked annually.  Denton also changed its approach to CCTV inspection, again based on the priority rankings. Denton’s asset management program has grown so robust it even includes trees. At the University of North Texas, located in the city, researchers have mapped Denton’s tree canopy using satellite imagery. Because of Denton’s use of technology and equipment Denton has cut wet-weather overflow volume by 99.5 percent, and instances of choked sewer mains – whether from roots, clogs or other problems- have fallen by as much as 94...

Read More

New Braunfels Sewer Construction Advisory

Sep 16

New Braunfels Sewer Construction Advisory

New Braunfels Utility crews is in the process of rehabilitating the city’s sewer lines this month. Please be advised that if you’re travelling near Post Road, thru-traffic will be re-routed between Gruene Road and Richter Lane during business hours 8am-5pm.  The alternate routes will be accessible and in use for up to a week.  This will allow the workers on the project to have the adequate space to navigate heavy equipment.  The trenchless method of installation used for this enhancement project will be CIPP (cured in place pipeline).  With the use of this technology, the NBU crews are able to invert a resin-saturated felt tube into a damaged pipe and use equipment to cure or harden it in place. Did you know that NBU has many community service initiatives working on your behalf?  This month, on September 26th, residents will be offered an opportunity to properly dispose of medications that are expired or unused. This program is called Operation MedSafe.  This year an additional drop off location will also be available.  The only thing that will not be accepted are disposals in liquid form.  This program helps to reduce the amount of pharmaceuticals that are found in the water systems. Dallas and Houston, SAVE THE DATE!!  Mark your calendars because you won’t want to miss this!  On September 23rd Perma-Liner Industries is hosting a very special event and we’d love to see you!!  We’re having our Open House at our facility in Plainfield, Illinois and it’s sure to be a great time.  We’ll have our excellent staff here to answer all of your questions about Cured-in-Place Pipeline products and our state of the art trenchless technology.  Come out and see live demonstrations, share friendly conversations and gain information.  Meals will be provided.  Please register at no cost: info@perma-liner.com or 1-866-336-2568. Click Here to...

Read More